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    Barbecue Tips

    A successful party starts with a great piece of meat. Even the best marinades, sauces, and dry-rubs cannot help if it is used on bad quality meat or fish. But what to do with that great piece of meat, how does it end up on the barbecue perfectly spiced? What do you use to spice, marinade or to mop? And which sauce do you serve with it? Even though a lot of it has to do with personal taste, there are a few basic principles.

    Mop sauces
    Mop sauces

    These are applied during barbecuing to glaze the meat regularly (mopping) to add taste and moisture. This technique is also known as basting. This is not completely right, since with basting, the pan drippings (for example if a large piece of meat is baked in the oven) are poured over the meat. A mop sauce is always thin, almost like water. Thinned out marinade can be used as a mop sauce, but you can also buy one at the store. Jim Beam Original Wing Sauce for example, which gives a great taste to chicken, and not just the wings!! And if used with care, Colgin Natural Hickory Seasoning Liquid Smoke also adds a great smoke taste to steaks or a hamburger.

    Barbecue and wing sauces
    Barbecue and wing sauces

    When it comes to barbecue meat, you sometimes need another sauce to serve it with. Barbecue sauces are ready-made and can be eaten right way, which is often not the case for marinades and mop sauces. Barbecue sauces are often less suitable to marinade, even though they can serve as ingredient of a marinade or can be thinned out with water to use as mop sauce. The same applies here: personal taste is what matters! A1, the number 1 barbecue sauce brand in America, has a number of super sauces, such as American Stockyard. Or what about Jim Beam BBQ Sauce?

    Marinade
    Marinade

    Marinating does not only add flavor to meat and fish (and vegetables), it also breaks down the connective tissue in meat, which makes it tender. The acid ingredient in a marinade makes sure of this (vinegar, wine, lemon, pineapple, etc.). How long something should be marinated depends on many factors, for example size, the part of the animal, the marinade, etc. Be careful with fish, since an acidic marinade can already cook it (just put a piece of cod in lemon juice and see what happens). For fish and to a lesser extent white meat such as chicken, you use a less acidic marinade with a bit more oil. Top BBQ sauce brand A1 offers great marinade mixes, which only need a little white wine vinegar, olive oil, and some water. Just try the Tomato Chili Pepper Marinade Mix. If you do not have a lot of time to create marinades and want to minimize the dirty dishes: Jack Daniel's has ready to use marinade in a bag. Just cut it open, put the meat in, wait for 30 minutes, and you are ready to barbecue!!

    Rubs
    Rubs

    Dry rubs are a little less well known with the Dutch. These are spices that are rubbed into the meat (barbecue lovers and pit masters use these all the time). A lot of these mixes contain red pepper powder, salt, and sugar, which are combined with many other herbs. The salt will detract some of the water from the meat, which will help solve the sugar (and the herbs). After approximately 40 minutes, the meat will absorb the fluid with the salt and the herbs again. The sugar in the part of the rub that remains on the outside will caramelize and gives your meat a nice crispy crust. Please do not use dry rubs with sugar in combination with coals, which will burn the sugar, instead of helping it caramelize. Online you can find a lot of great recipes for the classic dry rubs, but also try the ready-to-use Rufus Teague Meat & Fish Rubs